Call for Speakers 2024

Day 1: Tuesday, 20 June 2023

9:30

Registration and welcome refreshments

9:40

EEG synthetic data generation using probabilistic diffusion models

Tilburg University

THE NETHERLANDS
10:00

An ultra-precise binocular laser pupillometer

Quantum Biometronics

GREECE
10:20

Developing quality criteria for long-term testing of intracortical electrodes

Fraunhofer Institute For Toxicology And Experimental Medicine Item

GERMANY
10:50

Coffee Break

11:20

Neurofeedback to enhance response to hypnosis in individuals with multiple sclerosis

University Of Washington

UNITED STATES
11:45

Validation of in-ear EEG using full scalp EEG biomarkers

Idun Technologies

SWITZERLAND
12:15

Lunchtimen

13:45

fNIRS hyperscanning, a live demonstration

Nirx Medizintechnik Gmbh

GERMANY
14:15

A search for objective (EEG) criteria of subjective sleepiness

Fed Res Ctr Fundamental & Translat Med

GERMANY
14:40

Using the sense element engagement process to improve cortical prosthetic vision

Inner Psychophysics Ip Llc

UNITED STATES
15:05

Coffee Break

16:05

The BitBrain method for learning and inference at the edge

University of Manchester

UNITED KINGDOM
16:30

Py_neuromodulation: a feature estimation and decoding platform for brain implants

Charite Universtitätsmedizin Berlin

GERMANY
16:55

Networking

18:00

End

Day 2: Wednesday, 21 June 2023

9:30

Opening Remarks

9:40

Wearable neural sensors based on epitaxial graphene for hands-free robotic control

University of Technology Sydney

AUSTRALIA
10:05

Non-invasive brain stimulation in sleep disorders: from electrophysiology to neuromodulation

University Of Catania, Catania; Oasi Research Institute-irccs, Troina

ITALY
10:30

Timeflux: an open-source python framework for brain-computer interfaces

TIMEFLUX

FRANCE
10:55

Coffee Break

11:25

On the stimulation artifact reduction during electrophysiological recording of compound nerve action potentials

Fraunhofer Institute For Reliability And Microintegration Izm, Berlin, Germany Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

GERMANY
11:45

Assistive telehealth systems for neurorehabilitation

Canterbury Christ Church University

UNITED KINGDOM
12:00

How artificial intelligence is shaping brain computer interface

Gdansk University Of Technology

POLAND
12:20

Navigating challenges in digital dementia intervention: A Look at BCI potential

Metis Neurotec, Karlsruhe Institute Of Technology, Forschungszentrum Informatik (FZI)

GERMANY
12:35

Lunchtimen

14:05

Adaptable workflows for neural activity analysis in an open-source environment

Forschungszentrum Jülich

GERMANY
14:25

Signal processing (with questionable labels) in times of uncertainty

Hasso Plattner Institute

GERMANY
14:50

Industry use-cases of wireless EEG and EMG devices

Mindrove Kft

HUNGARY
15:05

PN relay

Politecnico Di Milano

ITALY
15:25

Networking

17:00

End

Speaking proposal 2023

Last updated on 11.06.2023.

Seveloping quality criteria for long-term testing of intracortical electrodes

Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine ITEM / Germany

Neural probes are crucial for diagnosis and treatment, as well as in prosthetic devices. However, the durability of these probes is limited due to scarring and material deterioration, which can lead to a decrease in signal quality. While materials, coatings, flexibility, and surgical techniques are explored to overcome these challenges, a systematic and industry-compatible process for long-term testing of new probe technologies is still lacking. The development of objective quality criteria for intracortical implant testing could reduce the risk for developers and improve treatment of patients suffering from neural diseases. Therefore, we are developing quality criteria, ranging from device characterization to data analysis, to enable reliable assessment of long-term functionality and further improve intracortical longevity.

The bitbrain method for learning and inference at the edge

University of Manchester / UNITED KINGDOM

BitBrain is a novel learning mechanism based upon a novel synthesis of ideas from sparse coding, computational neuroscience and information theory that enables fast, adaptive learning and accurate, robust inference. This method is designed to be implemented efficiently on neuromorphic devices as well as on more conventional CPU and memory architectures. The resulting inference mechanism has excellent performance on benchmarks such as MNIST and EMNIST, achieving state-of-the-art accuracy with single-pass learning. It provides a unique combination of single-pass, single-shot and continuous supervised learning; following a very simple unsupervised phase. Accurate classification inference that is very robust against imperfect inputs and noise has been demonstrated. These contributions make it uniquely well-suited for edge and IoT applications.

fNIRS hyperscanning, a live demonstration

NIRx Medizintechnik GmbH / GERMANY

In this fNIRS hyperscanning demo, we will showcase the potential of using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to simultaneously record brain activity from two individuals engaged in an interaction. This fNIRS hyperscanning demo is designed with quick setup, comfort, and mobility in mind. The system is designed to be comfortable for the participants, with lightweight and flexible optodes that do not interfere with their movement or comfort during the interaction. Additionally, we will showcase the portability of the system, which can be easily moved from one location to another for on-site data collection. Overall, our demo aims to demonstrate the ease and practicality of fNIRS. By demonstrating real-time data acquisition and analysis, we aim to highlight the applicability of fNIRS hyperscanning in various research domains, including neuroscience, psychology, and social sciences.

On the stimulation artifact reduction during electrophysiological recording of compound nerve action potentials

Fraunhofer Institute For Reliability And Microintegration Izm, Berlin, Germany Delft University Of Technology, The Netherlands / GERMANY

Recording neuronal activity triggered by electrical impulses is a powerful tool in neuroscience research and neural engineering. It is often applied in acute electrophysiological experimental settings to record compound nerve action potentials. However, the elicited neural response is often distorted by electrical stimulus artifacts, complicating subsequent analysis. In this talk, we present a model to better understand the effect of the selected recording amplifier configuration and the location of the ground electrode in a practical electrophysiological nerve setup. We present simulations results that show that the stimulus artifact can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude if the placement of the ground electrode, its impedance, and the amplifier configuration is optimized. We also present experimentally results which demonstrate the effects in three different settings, in-vivo and in-vitro.

Non-invasive brain stimulation in sleep disorders: from electrophysiology to neuromodulation

University of Catania, Catania; Oasi Research Institute-IRCCS, Troina. / ITALY

Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) is widely used for neuromodulatory purposes. When applied in sleep medicine, the main hypothesis explaining its effects concerns the induction of neural plasticity and the modulation of the strength of synaptic connections between the brain areas involved in sleep disorders. Recently, a multi-database-based search converges on the evidence that NIBS is safe and effective in insomnia, restless legs syndrome, and sleep deprivation-related cognitive deficits; limited data are available for sleep bruxism and REM sleep behavior disorder, whereas no relevant effect was observed in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and narcolepsy. Some limitations, especially regarding the population studied and the stimulation protocols adopted, need to be considered, although the development of individually tailored neuromodulatory techniques is promising.

Py_neuromodulation: a feature estimation and decoding platform for brain implants

Charite Universtitätsmedizin Berlin. / GERMANY

Brain computer interfaces (BCI) offer high precision for treating brain disorders, but there is a lack of standards for integrating data and estimating features using machine learning. To address this issue, we present a software framework called py_neuromodulation that combines adaptive deep brain stimulation and connectomics to facilitate brain circuit discovery for brain implants. We tested this platform on data from 73 patients with movement disorders, depression, and epilepsy. We identified Network targets for emotion decoding in depression patients, performed generalized movement decoding across cohorts with Parkinson’s disease from the US, Europe, and China, and improved seizure detection in responsive neurostimulation for epilepsy. The platform's capabilities aid precision medicine by enabling personalized therapy for patients with brain disorders.

Wearable neural sensors based on epitaxial graphene for hands-free robotic control

University of Technology Sydney / AUSTRALIA

We demonstrate the use of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide on silicon as dry EEG sensors for a wearable brain-machine interface (BMI) system which is reliable upon long-term usage. The produced sensors are wafer- thin, highly biocompatible, and show a lower contact impedance as compared to their bulkier commercial sensor counterparts and are are remarkably resilient to corrosion in saline environments. The BMI evaluation used a steady -state visual evoked potential paradigm (SSVEP), presenting the individual with up to 6 command options to control hands-free the movement of a robotic quadruped. We have demonstrated up to 94% accuracy in the lab using 6 graphene sensors mounted on a rudimental helmet in the presence of 5mm length hair.

Navigating challenges in digital dementia intervention: a look at bci potential

Metis Neurotec, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology / GERMANY

Due to demographic change, dementia is a huge challenge in our society. We are exploring the potentials of Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) within the METIS digital platform. METIS is a research-transfer project, which employs a multistage, risk-factor based approach to create individualized outpatient treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. For this, we designed, a hybrid electrode, allowing for non-intrusive, easy-to-perform BCI recordings, aiming to objectively assess treatment efficacy. Through AI integration and wearable technologies, we aim to fine-tune patient profiles and intervention strategies. BCIs present a novel objective measure for the success of dementia intervention strategies, offering an opportunity to positively influence disease progression.

A search for objective (EEG) criteria of subjective sleepiness

Fed Res Ctr Fundamental & Translat Med / GERMANY

Research of the subjective concept of sleepiness produced many controversial questions, including such questions as whether the physiological component of subjective feeling of sleepiness can be precisely defined in scientific terms, and whether the reliable physiological markers of subjective sleepiness (e.g., its EEG marker) can be identified. In the study of afternoon napping attempts of university students, we revealed the EEG-underpinnings of subjectively assessed sleepiness and concluded that the self-reports of these students on excessive daytime sleepiness can be trusted because 1) they demonstrated the signs of elevated sleep pressure during such napping attempts and 2) they are chronically sleep deprived during weekdays (when they are attending classes).

EEG synthetic data generation using probabilistic diffusion models

Tilburg University / THE NETHERLANDS

This presentation will discuss the use of Electroencephalography (EEG) technology in Brain Computer Interface (BCI) applications. The focus will be on the challenges of obtaining sufficient EEG data for training deep learning models and an advanced methodology for generating synthetic data using denoising diffusion probabilistic models. The proposed approach involves generating synthetic data from emotionally labeled EEG recordings and electrode-frequency distribution maps (EFDMs). The validity of the synthetic data generated was assessed through a qualitative and quantitative comparison with real EEG data. The proposed methodology has potential implications for creating large, publicly available synthetic EEG datasets, without privacy concerns.

Signal processing (with questionable labels) in times of uncertainty

Hasso Plattner Institute / GERMANY

Up to this day, most experiments and data analysis techniques focus on data recorded inside laboratory environments or simulations. However, life does not happen inside a laboratory but instead occurs mostly outside of it. There exists a gap between well-established data analysis methods and their applicability to data recorded in daily life. We conducted a user-centered study to provide methods for researchers to analyze physiological data from multi-modal EEG, PPG, and EDA sensors when participants are under mental workload and stress in daily life. While using laboratory measurements as reference data, we discuss some challenges encountered and the first insights we gained in working with data from uncontrolled environments.

Timeflux: an open-source python framework for brain-computer interfaces

Timeflux / France

The Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) field is currently experiencing a momentum, attracting both researchers and hackers. At the same time, a growing number of people rely on the thriving Python datascience and machine learning ecosystem. Yet, until recently, there was no fully open source Python framework for building BCIs. Timeflux aims to fill this gap. Attendees will learn what can BCIs be used for, how they actually work, what are the core concepts driving Timeflux, how to describe processing pipelines, how to create interfaces available from a web browser, and how to easily implement their own algorithms for both offline and online use. We will conclude with a practical example: a mind-controlled virtual keyboard.

Industry use-cases of wireless EEG and EMG devices

MindRove Kft. / HUNGARY

MindRove is dedicated to developing cutting-edge biosensing tools for the human-computer interaction field. Our innovative solutions have been utilized in various industries, including exoskeleton development, brain research, mental training, and VR. MindRove has 3 types of EEG devices and 2 types of EMG-based armband like sensors. Our EEG devices are versatile and easy to use. We have developed unique dry-electrodes. And we are in the middle of another development that we will be patented. We won a grant from ESA (European Space Agency) BIC Hungary to develop a neurofeedback application for astronaut training. We have an another serious space related project that we can announce at the NBT event.

An ultra-precise binocular laser pupillometer

Quantum Biometronics / GREECE

We will present a new binocular laser pupillometer, aimed to study the pupil light reflex with unprecedented precision. The laser pupillometer provides for the first time precise spatially-selective illumination of the eye and stimulation of the retina. It combines visible and infrared laser light, the former used for stimulus, and the latter for providing pointing information. The spatial selectivity provides order-of-magnitude increase in the neural information that can be extracted from measurements of the pupil diameter dynamics, and thus can lead to novel methodologies for addressing brain function and developing new medical diagnostic tools

How artificial intelligence is shaping brain computer interface

Gdansk University of Technology / POLAND

Artificial intelligence (AI) is revolutionizing the field of human-computer interfaces (HCI) by enhancing their capabilities and expanding their potential applications. AI algorithms analyze and interpret signals, gestures enabling more accurate and efficient communication between the human and external devices. But can AI change the course of Brain Computer Interfaces, especially this relying on surface EEG? By harnessing the power of AI, BCIs are becoming increasingly sophisticated, user-friendly, and capable of transforming the lives of individuals with disabilities, enhancing human cognition, and unlocking new frontiers in human-machine interaction.

Adaptable workflows for neural activity analysis in an open-source environment

Forschungszentrum Jülich / GERMANY

The coherence of neural activity analysis is challenged by an increasing heterogeneity of measurement devices, analysis tools, and data formats. To overcome these challenges, we emphasize the benefits of open-source tools, community standards, and modular design principles. Specifically, we present the Collaborative Brain Wave Analysis Pipeline (Cobrawap) as an adaptable and reusable analysis workflow solution for studying cortical wave activity. By leveraging the open-source software ecosystem, our pipeline approach allows the construction of reproducible workflows through seamless chaining of method blocks. Its inherent adaptability supports the processing of data from various measurement techniques and simulations, and the reuse and extension for wide-ranging research applications. Therefore, this open and modular approach enhances automation, integrates diverse methods, and enables comprehensive cross-domain comparisons.

Using the sense element engagement process to improve cortical prosthetic vision

Inner Psychophysics IP LLC / UNITED STATES

Sense element engagement theory provides a foundation for improving neuroprosthetic and neuroenhancement technology. Despite technological advances, the poor quality and utility of visual experience produced by stimulating visual cortex have changed little in 65 years. The theory describes prosthetic visual experience as a projection of patterns created by specified neural interactions and suggests a novel means for producing continuous visual forms. A neuromorphic device which uses population recordings to modulate the amplitude of intermittent cortical stimulation and is predicted to yield continuous visual forms has been integrated with V1 neural network simulations. Network spike distributions produced by simulations with the device are very similar to those produced by network-only simulations, and the number of phosphenes is classified very accurately using these distributions.

Neurofeedback to enhance response to hypnosis in individuals with multiple sclerosis

University of Wollongong / AUSTRALIA

Prior research indicates that resting state theta power predicts response to hypnosis treatment, suggesting the possibility that neurofeedback to enhance theta power might enhance response to clinical hypnosis. To examine this possibility in a pilot study, 22 individuals with multiple sclerosis and pain or fatigue were randomly assigned to five sessions of hypnosis treatment alone or five sessions of hypnosis combined with 10 sessions of neurofeedback. The results indicated larger improvements in pain intensity, sleep disturbance, and depression in participants who received the combined treatment than who received HYP alone. No between-group differences in fatigue were found. The results are consistent with the possibility that NF could be used to enhance response to hypnosis interventions.

Assistive telehealth systems for neurorehabilitation

Canterbury Christ Church University / UNITED KINGDOM

Telehealth is an evolving field within the broader domain of Biomedical Engineering, specifically situated within the context of the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT). In today's society, the importance of Telehealth systems is increasingly recognized, as they enable remote patient treatment by physicians. One significant application in neurorehabilitation is Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which has demonstrated its effectiveness in modulating mental function and learning over several years. Furthermore, tDCS is widely accepted as a safe approach in the field. This presentation focuses on the development of a non-invasive wearable tDCS device with integrated Internet connectivity. This IoMT device enables remote configuration of treatment parameters, such as session duration, current level, and placebo status. Clinicians can remotely access the device and define these parameters within the approved safety ranges for tDCS treatments. In addition to the wearable tDCS device, a prototype web portal is being developed to collect performance data during neurorehabilitation exercises conducted by individuals at home. This portal also facilitates remote interaction between patients and clinicians. To provide a platform-independent solution for accessing up-to-date healthcare information, a Progressive Web Application (PWA) is being developed. The PWA enables real-time communication between patients and doctors through text chat and video conferencing. The primary objective is to create a cross-platform web application with PWA features that can function effectively as a native application in various operating systems.

Validation of in-ear eeg using full scalp eeg biomarkers

IDUN Technologies / Switzerland

This talk will focus on the validation of in-ear EEG using full scalp EEG biomarkers. Over a series of experiments, we have used our in-ear EEG sensor to reproduce standard EEG biomarkers such as such as ASSR, SSVEO, SSEP, HEOG, Alpha etc. as well as sleep-based biomarkers such as K-complexes, sleep spindles, slow waves, arousal and REM. Our results showed that in-ear EEG compares favourably to the gold standard scalp EEG in the detection of these biomarkers. This talk will explain in detail the types of biomarkers studied and to what extent they were reproduced, as well as protocols used to elicit them and analysis methods.

PN relay

Politecnico di Milano / ITALY

The PN Relay project in its entirety involves the construction of a fully implanted active device. Its application will be to detect the peripheral nerve signal coming from a nerve (such as the sciatic nerve) in order to subsequently re-establish the connection between the two ends of a nerve lesion, creating a functional bypass. The system allows a possible restoration of the lost function of a patient with a pathology that cannot be treated with traditional medicine. The project includes the scope of neural interfaces and signal classification.

Submit your proposal for 2024

Date, time & venue

  • Tuesday, 11 June 2024: from 9:00 to 18:00. / Wednesday, 12 June 2024: from 9:00 to 17:00
  • WISTA Management Conventions. Rudower Chaussee 17, 12489 Berlin, Germany.

Fees

  • Academic talks: Free of charge for up to 25 minutes including Q&A.
  • Product Demos: Speakers will be charged 880,-€ (VAT excluded) for up to 30 minutes including Q&A.
  • There is no submission fee.

Format

    • All oral presentations are in-person only. There is no virtual or hybrid option for attendees.
    • There will be no poster sessions.

    Language

    The conference language is English.

    Submission deadline

      There is no set deadline to submit a speaking proposal until all open slots are filled.